The Murder Game (Julie Apple)

29619695Ten years working as a prosecutor have left Meredith Delay jaded and unsure of what she wants out of life. She’s good at her job, but it haunts her. Her boyfriend wants her to commit, but she keeps him at arm’s length. Then Meredith is assigned to a high-profile prosecution involving the violent murder of a fallen hockey star. At first, it appears to be just another case to work. But when her old friend Julian is accused of the murder, it takes on a whole new dimension. Meredith, Julian, Jonathan, and Lily were a tight-knit group in law school. But now, Jonathan’s defending Julian, and Lily’s loyalties aren’t clear. And when Julian invokes a rare—and risky—defense, Meredith is forced to confront their past. Has something they played at as students finally been brought to death?

As soon as I finished reading the author’s previous book, I knew I had to get my hands on The Murder Game. I don’t know if I’m the minority, but I enjoyed this one way more than Fractured, maybe because I felt every detail here was important.

With Fractured, even though I thought it was a really entertaining book, I felt like something was missing and couldn’t understand why the author included some storylines that ended up not being that relevant in the end. In The Murder Game, though, I thought everything made sense and I was satisfied with the conclusion as well. Was it all a bit predictable? Maybe. Did I mind? Not really.

Maybe it’s because I’ve always loved courtroom dramas, but this book was simply lots of fun and I simply couldn’t stop reading. It reminded me (as the blurb states) of How To Get Away With Murder and that’s definitely a good thing. Here we have two different storylines: one set in 1995 and the other one set around 2007.

The main character is Meredith, a young law student in 1995’s Montreal who quickly starts hanging out with a very interesting crowd: Julian, Jonathan and Lily. Years later, one of her friends, Julian, has been accused of murder and her ex-boyfriend Jonathan is defending him in the trial. Everything changes when Meredith is asked to prosecute her former friend. But what if the crime had some similarities to a case they studied in college? Is it possible that her friend is actually guilty?

I’m not going to say anything more about the plot, just that it’s definitely a twisty one. Even though I wasn’t shocked by the conclusion, I did love how it all ended. Surprisingly, I enjoyed both past and present storylines equally and thought they were both essential to the story.

My only complaint is that I didn’t like the main character at all (or any of her friends), so I didn’t warm up to them and, as a result, I didn’t really care about what would happen to them. However, the book was still engaging and most of the time I could easily forget about annoying Meredith and focus only on the plot.

P.S This is the book that Fractured’s Julie Apple had written that caused such controversy. You don’t need to read Fractured to read this one, in fact, you’ll be more surprised if you don’t.

Similar recommendations:

The Basic Eight (Daniel Handler)
The Secret History (Donna Tart)

Other reviews:

Lavender Books
Books Are Love

⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️

 CreateSpace, 2016 – Netgalley

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31 thoughts on “The Murder Game (Julie Apple)

  1. I am glad that I requested this book when you first mentioned it. It sounds quite good. I like how it compares to Fractured. I enjoyed Fractured apart from the big reveal. This sounds pretty good. I can’t wait to read it. Oh and I do love How to get away with murder. Brilliant review as usual.

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    1. This “fictional” bool caused controversy inside the Fractured novel 😂 It’s all very meta. Basically, the author of this one (fake) is the main character of Fractured

      Liked by 1 person

  2. Oh 🙈 don’t mind me, I was just looking for some juicy gossip 😂😂
    I’m sure it’ll make sense once I’ve read the books, Fractured is on my list and I shall be adding this one also 🙂

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  3. OOh, controversy and exciting twists!! Me like! Also, if you don’t like the main character at all, doesn’t that mean you could care what happens to them, as in hoping they’ll die 😉 ;). Awesome review as always!

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  4. A legal thriller! Me likey! I love them way too much. It’s my last link with my year in Law school, haha. It’s so hard to find good ones! I like your similar recommendation at the end of the post, it’s very handy! I haven’t read Fractured, I’ll make sure to read this one first! Great review!

    Liked by 1 person

  5. “With Fractured, even though I thought it was a really entertaining book, I felt like something was missing and couldn’t understand why the author included some storylines that ended up not being that relevant in the end. ”

    Me too!!! I kept thinking certain parts were going to come around full circle but didn’t… I’m wondering if the editing process had something to do with this?!

    I also didn’t like any of the characters in Fractured… but it didn’t really hinder my enjoyment of it. I assumed this book was going to be the same.

    Great review 😊

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  6. This sounds so fun! I luuurve stories where stuff a clique of friends get up to in school or university comes back to haunt them years later (and on that note, if you haven’t read them, I highly recommend Lucie Whitehouse’s The House at Midnight, Ivo Stourton’s The Night Climbers, Richard Mason’s Us, Jennifer McMahon’s Dismantled… I could go on forever, haha).

    Liked by 1 person

        1. The reviews in Goodreads aren’t very good 😦 But I trust you haha I’ll save it. I read a McMahon book a while ago and loved it, so maybe I can check that one too

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