Baby (Marie Campbell)

31120326.jpgWhen Michael Stanton goes to work one day and doesn’t come back, everyone – friends, family, police – thinks his pregnant girlfriend Jill should accept he’s left her. After all, he’s done it before. But Jill just won’t believe that Michael would walk away from her and their unborn child. Increasingly desperate and alone, she’s determined to find him. Just where is Michael? What Jill doesn’t know is that his beautiful ex, Anna, wants him back, and won’t take no for an answer. 

If you usually read my reviews, you know I can’t say no to a good psychological thriller. So when Baby appeared in my radar, I decided I wanted to read this one. The blurb was mysterious enough and I knew I’d probably enjoy it given my love for psychotic characters doing extreme things.

Baby tells the story of a young man called Michael whose girlfriend Jill is pregnant. Michael used to be kind of a player, but now he has settled down thanks to her. The problem is that one of his ex-girlfriends, a nurse called Anna, hasn’t forgotten about him. So when they meet years later in a bar, Anna drugs and kidnaps him, trying to make him love her again. Meanwhile, Jill is left alone and everyone seems to think Michael has just fled because he wasn’t ready for a kid. But she’s determined to prove they are all wrong. Michael wouldn’t do that to her, would he? But Michael might not be ready to forget about Anna either…

Baby was a fairly short book (less than 300 pages), so yes, I read this in a day. Chapters were short and told from Michael and Jill’s points of view (shocking, right?). However, the author did something unique when changing perspectives, which I thought was great. “While Michael was doing this, Jill was doing that”. Hadn’t seen that technique before and it felt fresh.

The writing was pretty good and what I enjoyed the most about Baby is that I was ALWAYS interested in what the author was telling. The storyline was super addictive and Jill was extremely likable, so I wanted to know what would happen to her. Michael… well, that’s another story. The typical excuse: “he’s a man and he can’t help it” doesn’t work for me and I think the problem is that most people would have never accepted this behavior if the roles had been reversed. So no, I can’t possibly justify Michael’s actions and that’s why I couldn’t connect with him. Anna was a complex character and while she was completely crazy, I also felt sorry for her (which doesn’t mean I understand what she did, which I obviously don’t).

While Baby’s storyline wasn’t very original and it didn’t have a particularly surprising ending, I think it’s still a good book and I would’ve love to read a few more pages about these characters. I felt that, at times, the narration moved rather too quickly (especially at the beginning!) and I would’ve wanted more background on Jill & Michael and Anna & Michael’s relationship. And what about Stuart? I found that part of the book really interesting, and there were only a couple of pages dedicated to him.

All in all, Baby is a good psychological thriller, a fast read and one of those books I never mind picking up and reading. You know which ones I mean: they’re fun to read (even if the topic is not) and you’ll never be disappointed. Addictive and easy to read.

⭐️⭐️⭐️

The Conrad Press, 2016

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I received a copy of this e-book in exchange for an honest review.

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Annie

In a past life I was probably a tortured police detective with a dark and traumatic past. Right now, however, I'm just a twenty-something bookworm who loves to listen to old songs and watch American movies from the nineties. I enjoy reading mystery and crime, southern coming of age stories and historical fiction set in the last century.

23 thoughts on “Baby (Marie Campbell)

  1. I’m not a huge psych thriller person, but I do enjoy ones like these that are fast-paced and easy to read so that you can push through them in a day! If they’re too long I have to be stuck in whatever character’s darkness for longer, and I hate that! These books are often so depressing, because people are always making dumb life choices!
    Ali @ the bandar blog

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  2. I’ve been reading a lot more psychological thrillers and mysteries lately. This sounds interesting. And I also love that her name is Jill and that’s she’s a likable character. 🤗 That is weird for the book to have multiple POV like that. It was done well in Gone Girl, but you don’t see it often. I bet that threw you off at first.

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      1. Most of the thrillers I’ve read are told from one POV with the exception of Gone Girl. A lot of them also seem to jump back and forth between past and present. I like that. I’ve been reading a lot more mysteries and thrillers lately, and I was going to contact a small publisher that reps mostly those genres to see about review copies. They really are addicting once you start. I’m about to start Three Truths and a Lie. That one has mixed reviews.

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            1. Until you’re mine by Sam Hayes, Before I go to sleep by SJ Watson, Distress Signals. Lie with me. Behind closed doors. I let you go. Good as gone. The swimming pool. The couple next door 🙂

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    1. She was great, unlike her husband 😑😑😑😑 The POV worked pretty well, it’s actually super common in these thrillers, you’ll see!!

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  3. That excuse is a shame. I can’t believe it still stands. Sometimes a nice book doesn’t have to be full of surprises or twists to have us hooked. I like the POV, this books sounds right into the good psychological thrillers that won’t ask too much of you but will give you a great time 🙂

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  4. I’m 100% with you in that I’m over the whole ‘boys will be boys’ excuse. I’m also over domestic thrillers where there are two (or more) women fighting over the same man (who’s usually a total douchenozzle). But I do like the idea of a pregnant woman setting out to find her missing partner. It’s just a shame he’s been predictably kidnapped by the crazy ex. …I don’t think this one’s for me, LOL.

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