All Is Not Forgotten (Wendy Walker)

All Is Not Forgotten 26114146
Wendy Walker
St Martin’s Press
2016

In the small, affluent town of Fairview, Connecticut everything seems picture perfect. Until one night when young Jenny Kramer is attacked at a local party. In the hours immediately after, she is given a controversial drug to medically erase her memory of the violent assault. But, in the weeks and months that follow, as she heals from her physical wounds, and with no factual recall of the attack, Jenny struggles with her raging emotional memory. Her father, Tom, becomes obsessed with his inability to find her attacker and seek justice while her mother, Charlotte, prefers to pretend this horrific event did not touch her perfect country club world. As they seek help for their daughter, the fault lines within their marriage and their close-knit community emerge from the shadows where they have been hidden for years, and the relentless quest to find the monster who invaded their town – or perhaps lives among them – drive this psychological thriller to a shocking and unexpected conclusion.

Jenny was fifteen when she was raped at a party. Nobody knows who did it and she can’t help them find out because she was given a drug to help her forget the trauma. She can’t recall anything from that particular event, which might seem like a blessing for some, except that it isn’t. She might not remember, but her body does. She feels it, she senses it and she doesn’t know how to deal with it. That’s where the psychiatrist, Adam, comes in.

This is a unique story mostly because it’s not told by the girl, Jenny, or the parents: Charlotte and Tom. Instead, we’re reading the story as it’s narrated by Adam, the psychiatrist who starts treating Jenny and her parents a year after the incident. This voice is kind of weird and fascinating because Adam actually knows what these people think: he’s been listening to their thoughts. So I think choosing him as the narrator was a great idea, even though I know not everyone shares this opinion.

What would you do if you suffered a trauma like our main character? Would you prefer to forget or would you rather live with it and try to move on? I don’t know much about psychiatry or medicine, but I found all the details and data to be quite realistic and easy to understand. The doctor often used metaphors to explain the medical terms and I greatly appreciated that.

All in all, this was a fascinating read. I feel like I’ve said this too many times lately, but I had never read anything quite like this: it was a fresh, interesting book about a powerful topic. I have to say, though, that this is not a psychological thriller per se. It’s psychological, yes, but I don’t think this is a thriller, it’s more like a psychological drama. And while it has a mystery (who raped Jenny?), that was not what the book was about Although, of course, I wanted to know, this is The Misstery after all ;).

My only problem with this novel is that there was a part in the middle where I became a bit bored, as I didn’t know how the plot would unfold. Thankfully, the story picked up after that and the last half was simply unputdownable. The ending was satisfying as well and I especially liked the part about the relationship between Jenny and the soldier.

And the last sentence? Wow.

⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️

I received a copy via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.

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Annie

In a past life, I was probably a tortured police detective with a dark and traumatic past. Right now, however, I'm just a twenty-something bookworm who loves listening to old songs and watching 90s movies. I enjoy mystery and crime, southern coming of age stories and historical fiction set in the last century.

8 thoughts on “All Is Not Forgotten (Wendy Walker)

  1. What a fascinating concept! The idea of a drug that can erase a memory, is both interesting and terrifying to me. What would I do I’m that situation? Very thought provoking 🤔

    Like

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